Winter to Spring

As winter acquiesces to springtime in the mountains,

light peals back the darkness of morning

earlier and earlier,

and stays later and later

each day.

Like a dinner party invitee,

The Light is akin to that dude who

awkwardly and unexpectedly arrives

way ahead of the appointed time of the soiree.

And later,

after all the food is gone and the dishes are put away,

and the roar of the fire is down to its flickering embers,

The Light is that last lingering guest,

begging the host to question:

What the heck is this guy still doing here?

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Freedom of Routine

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I used to think it would be terribly status quo to do the same thing day in and day out – some present day torture resulting in a robotic, sad life void of meaning and vigor.  But now, with aging eyes and dharmic direction, I see great freedom and joy in creating a daily rhythm, ordinary and relatively unchanging.  Of course, our motivation must be well applied and properly set (otherwise a routine can become dry and numbing).

I’ve been thinking about my own simple daily routines lately and how they offer me nourishment and support throughout the day.  My alarm is set to wake me up at 5:03am (yep, not 5:00, 5:03) Monday through Saturday (Sundays are my days to sleep in).  Oftentimes, however, I wake up before my alarm goes off.  After I get up I make some tea and drink slowly as I read by book light in the living room for 20-30 minutes (currently I am reading a book called Meeting Faith, Forest Journals of a Black Buddhist Nun).   I then set a timer, sing the morning chant (you can give a listen to my recording here http://openway.org/content/morning-chant), and practice sitting meditation for 20 minutes in the quiet stillness of the darkened early morning.  I finish my sitting meditation with three prostrations to the earth, in which I offer a different gratitude with each one, followed by one final standing bow in which I say to myself:

“In gratitude for this one more opportunity to live today, may I be useful, may I be kind.”

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Spring Time

A picture my friend Luke Johnson took in Hawaii in February

A picture my friend Luke Johnson took in Hawaii in February

 

Thin curved branches topped with new golden mustard shoots

announce spring’s reappearance,

splendid as mountain’s dawn ricocheting on pine bristled rocky spines

echoing to the valley floor spread below –

Breathing in I am alighted by the warmth of the sun

Breathing out I smile to the beauty of nature enveloping me –

And is not everything nature really?

Yes, the earth and sky and waters of course,

the fruits of their labor, their rich colors and sweet fragrance,

but also the glistening web of wires strung from pole to pole coursing with

electricity and information,

brick and mortar buildings,

asphalt and gravel,

big rigs, smoke stacks, metal grain bins, and water treatment plants –

Nothing can be separated from nature,

nothing discarded in the name of connection –

Everything we have created

has come from, and will go back to,

this one sacred and most amazing planet

Gratitude Walk

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In an attempt to get a little more movement into my days I’ve recently started taking walks.  And to add a mindfulness practice element to these walks I’ve taken to using them as an opportunity to get in touch with gratitude.  I’ve found that infusing gratitude into my walks also helps me to feel more inspired to get out and do it.  It feels less exercise and chore like when I’m intentionally looking around to connect and appreciate my surroundings.

Yesterday I walked to the river, which runs through town.  One of the bike paths is just two blocks away and goes all the way to the river, about a 30-40 minute walk from where I live.  So I hopped on the bike path and away I went, iPod in tow.

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Spring Retreat, 2014

Flathead Lake. Montana

Flathead Lake. Montana

 

We just had our local Montana Open Way Sanghas annual spring retreat which started Thursday May 1st in the evening and ended on Sunday May 4th in the early afternoon.  Our retreat was held once again at the beautiful Flathead Lutheran Bible Camp in Lakeside, MT, which sits right on the Flathead Lake.  Dharma teacher Michael Ciborski led our retreat, of which 48 people were in attendance.  If you’re interested in listening to the dharma talks he gave during the retreat please go to: http://openway.org/audio

Our Montana Open Way Sanghas consist of four sanghas in three different cities in western Montana: Open Way and Be Here Now in Missoula, Flowing Mountains in Helena, and Open Sky in Kalispell.  We are all Thich Nhat Hanh based sanghas with strong communities in our respective locations that join together for two annual retreats a year, mindfulness days, council meetings, and other events throughout the year.  I feel very fortunate and grateful to be part of such a vibrant mindfulness community here in big sky country.

Meditation hall (aka the zendo)

Meditation hall (aka the zendo)

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Nourishing the Sacred in Each Other

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Tomorrow night is the start of our local bi-annual Open Way Sanghas mindfulness retreat in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh.  Dharma teacher Michael Ciborski is our visiting teacher who will be leading the retreat.  He has been leading retreats here in Montana once a year for the last few years.  And this year for the first time he ventured here with his wife Fern and their youngest child Fiana who is two-years old.

To offer a wonderful practice opportunity to the greater Missoula community I helped put together a public talk tonight entitled: Nourishing the Scared in Each Other where Michael spoke on the topics of mindfulness, deep breathing, and coming back home to the present moment.  It was a beautiful spring evening here in the mountains, the sky was a crisp blue and the sun shone down into the valley with radiance and delicate warmth.  Here in the rocky mountains of western Montana, where the chill of winter’s embrace dog ear’s more calendar months than it skips, it can often be difficult to wrangle people indoors when the sun starts to color in the landscape.  But tonight we managed to fill a room in the Continuing Education Building on the campus of the University of Montana with 50 people – and considering we were up against the International Wildlife Film Festival I think we had a great sized crowd.

Public Talk at the University of Montana

Public Talk at the University of Montana

Michael opened up the talk guiding us in some breathing exercises and then went on to speak about how our breath can put us in touch with what’s actually happening in the here and now (as opposed to getting carried away by our stories or worries…).  He said that it’s important to develop a strong muscle of returning home, by which he is referring to the present moment.  Our true home is in the present moment, it is the only moment where we are truly alive!  We cannot reside in the past, for it has already happened, and we cannot reside in the future, for it has not yet come to be.  Right here and right now, this is it!

He spoke about a three-point system (so to speak):

Stop – Connect – Engage

To stop means to stop running, stop worrying, stop the anxiety, sorrow, fear and other strong habit energies that inhibit our ability to come home to ourselves in the present moment and serve no skillful means on the path of transformation.  To connect means to become one with.  And to engage is to embrace and love deeply.

MIchael Ciborski

MIchael Ciborski

I wrote down a quote from Michael as he was talking that I really appreciated:

“We have tremendous power in the little moments of our life.”

This insight needs to be more than an intellectual comprehension.  This teaching is a deep, rich, and beautiful practice that we need to put into action as a collective community in order to foster our connection to ourselves, our environment, and one another.  Indeed it is only in the small moments of life that transformation is possible.  With mindfulness, every act we do is an opportunity to come back home.

Basking

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After I saw my thirteen year-old out the door this morning on his walk to school I did a few minutes of sitting meditation embraced in a warm spring sun beam shining in through my bedroom window.  I felt my posture stable and relaxed soaking up the sun as my lips curved to form a gentle smile.

After my meditation I headed out to do some childcare for some friends of mine.  They have a five-year old boy and a recently turned 2-year old girl.  Before I was injured and contracted a nerve disease which qualified me for disability a few years ago I was a nanny and before that I worked in pre-schools and day cares.  I love hanging out with kids.  They have much wisdom and much to teach.

I spent my day making up silly songs about underwear falling down (to the tune of London Bridge), since the 5-year old, like many boys his age, enjoys toilet humor, negotiating healthy snacks and a proper lunch to kids who would rather eat popsicles and pizza for every meal, playing frisbee with suction cups in hand (an idea sparked by the five-year old), and trying to convince the 2-year old that bugs were not bad.  I also fielded many 5-year old budding questions such as, “Why do you wear the same clothes everyday?” and in response to my bowing in gratitude to my plate of food at lunch, “What are you doing?”

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Indeed I have been wearing the same clothes everyday now since November.  I have two pairs of the exact same style and color of dark brown pants and about five or six of the exact same style and color moss green shirt.  I commended him for his awareness and explained how I enjoy the simplicity of having only one outfit.  He seemed to understand and then asked me how many pairs of shoes I owned, to which I answered, “I have three pairs of shoes.  These ones I’m wearing (my crocs which I wear most often), my snow boots, and a pair of motorcycle boots (which I only wear when I’m on my bike of course).”

I also enjoyed talking to him more about why I give thanks to my food before I eat.  With a really puzzled expression on his face he asked, “Do you thank your food EVERY time you eat?” to which I answered, “Yes, I do!”  Unlike the having one outfit conversation it took him longer to begin understanding this concept of thanking the food.  I spoke with him about how having food was a gift and that not everyone in the world had enough food to eat.  Then I mentioned how the farmers had to grow the peanuts for the peanut butter and strawberries for the jelly, how the trucks had to work to transport the food to the stores, and about all the different workers involved in helping bring the food to our plates.  After briefly explaining all of that he said, “OR you could just go to the store and get the food,” to which I asked, “But how does the food get there?”  He thought about it for a moment and then I said, “We need the farmers and the trucks and all the people to get the food to the stores.  Without all of those people we’d have no food in the stores.  That’s why I like to give my thanks to the food.”

A productive day I would say!  Kids have a beautiful and simply way of communicating and they are in every moment always ready to absorb and learn and grow.

Reflecting on the day the practice of present moment, wonderful moment was alive and strong.  I feel gratitude coursing through me for youth, playfulness, the sun, laughter, silliness, good questions, and taking the time to stop and literally smell the blooming flowers.  And now in the solitude of night under a clear dark sky I am enjoying the ease of a clean and quiet house.