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Thank Goodness

12 Mar

schulz_thank_goodness_for_c

Lately I’ve been thinking about how wonderful it is that there are people who gravitate towards different causes, do different jobs, and are impassioned about different things. In short, as Charles Schulz’s book title states above: Thank goodness for people.

Thank goodness for the writers, artists, and musicians. Thank goodness for those working for human rights and the environment and better treatment of animals. Thank goodness for the grocery store stockers, clerks, and managers. Thank goodness for the long-haul truckers, pilots, and train conductors. Thank goodness for moms and dads, grandparents, and babysitters. Thank goodness for the roofers, plumbers, electricians, carpenters, inspectors, painters, and window installers. Thank goodness for those drawn to public service, social work, and mental health. Thank goodness for nurses and doctors and EMT’s. Thank goodness for the local coffee shops and eateries. Thank goodness for the farmers, ranchers, and growers. Thank goodness for administrators, financial advisers, tech people, and CEO’s. Thank goodness for the miners, drillers, and factory workers. Thank goodness for the president and those who serve our government. Thank goodness for teachers and faith leaders. Thank goodness for the staff and volunteers at homeless shelters, suicide prevention numbers, 12-step meetings, and rape crisis centers. Thank goodness for good people drawn to doing good things in a million different ways.

A web of people are needed to propel our way of life forward. And there’s no one who can be deemed as insignificant. It is also almost impossible to name a job, group, person, thing, place, or interest that can be shallowly labeled as inherently or completely wrong and evil. While we are quick to make judgements about who and what is good and bad, life cannot be  categorized in such insufficient ways. When we are tuned into the complex web of what makes our world function, mindful of how we’re all leaning on and creating one another with every breath, the nature of our interdependence becomes very clear – and a catalyst for deep appreciation.

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1 Comment

Posted by on March 12, 2016 in Everyday Practice

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

One response to “Thank Goodness

  1. 5amt3n

    June 20, 2016 at 2:01 pm

    This is beautiful. Thank you.

     

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